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White bait, Flathead fillet and spinach

  Ingredients: Purchase some white bait and flathead fillets from your local fishmonger. Fresh white bait should still have firmness and not be too soft or squishy. Flathead fillets are a lovely soft white fleshed fish to use when feeding fussy kids. 1 bunch Fresh English Spinach 1 cup of either flour or almond meal (if you want to avoid gluten) 1 tablespoon olive oil Salt and pepper to taste   Method: Wash, then roughly chop the spinach and put into a steamer. Generously coat a large pan with oil (extra-light olive oil is good) so that there is a 5mm layer over the bottom, and place it on the stove When the pan has heated sufficiently to crisp and bubble a pinch of flour, place the flour/almond meal into a ziplock or other plastic bag along with some salt and pepper and put the fish into it, sealing the bag and shaking the contents until they are nicely coated. Don't leave them in the bag too long or they will go sticky. Remove fish from the bag and fry them in the pan, being careful not to put too many in at once. Turn them over when golden underneath. It should only take a few minutes to fry the fish to a golden colour, then remove and place them on some paper to drain off. As the last batch of fish is set to fry, steam the spinach and then season with some freshly crushed garlic, olive oil and pepper. Plate the fish, using the spinach as an accompaniment. Add a squeeze of lemon juice over the fish as a final enhancement and garnish with some parsley or sliced shallots.

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Improving your posture

Bad posture has been blamed for every possible ailment of the human condition, but most particularly for those common musculoskeletal problems such as backache, headaches and muscle fatigue. Most everybody remembers their mother telling them to "stop slouching" or "sit up straight" at some point during their teenage years (or even later!). But what is "Good Posture" as opposed to "Bad Posture"? What is posture anyway? If my posture is bad, how do i fix it?

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Upper Cross and Lower Cross Syndromes

If your head is positioned forward of normal, if your backside sticks out too much, if you have a weak pendulous abdomen and are pigeon toed- chances are you are suffering from a cross syndrome. What is it? Due to the sedentary nature of life today, most people have some degree of contracture or tightening in the front of their hips. This continuous tight area produces a weak and elongated gluteal (backside) region. Similarly, sitting at a desk with the head forward of normal leads to a contracture of the front of the neck muscles and a reactive spasm in the upper back. A series of further contractures and inhibitions result in a cascade of reactionary muscle imbalances that lead to the posture typically described as both Lower and Upper Cross Syndrome.

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Scheuermanns Disease

Scheuermanns Disease is a condition that affects the discs and vertebrae of the Thoracic Spine (mid back), though the low back is also less commonly affected. Normally, a vertebra is rectangularly shaped, but in Scheuermanns disease, three or more consecutive vertebrae are wedge shaped at the front, which makes the curve increase.

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Spondylolisthesis

Spondylolisthesis is a condition in which a vertebra (Greek=spondylos) shifts from its normal position (Greek=listhesis). Most cases of Spondylolisthesis are Anterolistheses (forward slippages).     How does it occur? The shift from its normal position most commonly happens due to defect (or less commonly an elongation) in the pars interarticularis or isthmuswhich is a section of bone that joins the front of the vertebra to the arch in the rear. This type of spondylolisthesis is called "isthmic" and is found in about 10% of the population. Male to female incidence is roughly 2:1, though slippage tends to be worse in females. There is evidence to suggest a familial tendency. There still remains some debate as to whether the gap is an actual fracture (most likely in childhood, possibly through constant falls on the bottom), or whether it is a failure of that section of bone to fuse together properly as the child grows. The pars interarticularis has been identified as being subject to more mechanical stress than any other structure in the lumbar spine, so the development of stress fractures are a plausible theory. They have been found in children, adolescents and adults. To date, humans are the only species in which the condition has been identified.

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