Health

Amine Sensitivity

Amines are naturally occurring chemicals caused by the breakdown of proteins especially in meats, fish and dairy, as well as in the fermentation of other foods such as vegetables, wines, beers, ciders, vinegars, and soy sauces. They are highest in concentration in the aging and curing of meats such as in salamis, prosciuttos, hams, etc.; when meats are cooked or grilled and in the production of cheeses. Amines enhance the flavour of food - think of the difference in flavour between a raw steak and a grilled one.  Proteins are necessary for survival, so the best way to ensure a minimal input of amines is to eat meats and other amine containing foods in their freshest possible state, as aging (such as with beef and pork packaging in supermarkets) will cause increased amine production even if the food hasn't "gone off". It has been noted that even freezing wont stop amine production, so the rule of strictly fresh is best to follow.

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Bedwetting in children

A common children's condition we see at the clinic is bedwetting (nocturnal enuresis). It is normal for children below the ages of 4 or 5 to lack control of their bladder, however, if this continues after the age of 5, it could signify a problem. Primary enuresis is described as bedwetting in a child beyond 5 years old who has never been able to establish good bladder control. Secondary enuresis is described as a bedwetting relapse in a child who was previously toilet trained.   There are several alternative medicine therapies that have published reports on treatments for bedwetting. These include:   Dietary modification Craniosacral therapy Acupuncture  

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Treatment during Pregnancy

Pregnancy carries a range of experiences for new mums-to-be. Besides the joy of nurturing a new life, there are also the more uncomfortable experiences of back ache, sciatica, carpal tunnel syndrome, swollen legs and nausea that needs to be endured. As her body changes, a woman will experience a shift in weight bearing position, a change in her posture and greater strain on her back and pelvis. All of these discomforts can be relieved through a range of therapies performed by our practitioners, ranging from acupuncture, craniosacral therapy, manual therapy, spinal manipulation and myofascial therapy.

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Cravings and nutritional deficiencies

by Lorena Valeri, naturopath What do you crave?   Sweet, salty, fatty or starchy, other? According to Vera Tweed (2015), experts are now saying that although unhealthy eating habits are formed in childhood, there is hope for us yet; they now believe that the brain can be re-programmed for a healthier culinary experience. Also studies showed that although some cravings can highlight some nutritional deficiencies in many cases the food we crave may not exactly correct those deficiencies.   Some studies have found that sugar and starch cravings may be a result of low blood sugar and the body trying to correct itself (though not in a long term productive way). Eating sugars and starches will spike blood sugar and as sure as things go up, they must also come crashing down (sometimes fast). To avoid this occurring, the Tweed (2015) recommends eating a protein and a healthy piece of fruit which will stabilize blood sugar for longer periods.   Other surprising triggers for cravings in the report: Late nights (which is not good, as our bodies are programed to store more calories at night). Apparently eating protein for breakfast helps to reduce sugary cravings at night time. Diet soft drinks / sodas Diet soda was found to ‘make people choose higher calorie snacks and feel less satisfied with food’ (according to a study at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth) Studies also indicate that artificial sweeteners promote weight gain and diabetes by changing the good bacteria in your gut. Let’s breakdown the cravings: Craving                                                Possible Deficiency                           Craving Antidote: Sugary Foods Chromium, carbon, phosphorus, sulfur or tryptophan Grapes, other fresh fruit, nuts, vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage, sweet potatoes and spinach Salty Foods Chloride or silicone Celery, tomatoes, lettuce, seaweed, cashews, or seeds Fatty Foods or Dairy Calcium Mustard, turnip greens, broccoli, almonds, salmon, kale, legumes, low fat dairy or sesame seeds Starchy foods Nitrogen Dark leafy greens i.e. Kale or collards, nuts and seeds, eggs, lean chicken or turkey Chocolate – Dark  Chocolate – dairy milk Magnesium,  Good fats i.e. Omega 3 type. Nuts, fish and leafy green vegetables, organic cacaoNuts and seeds, tuna, salmon, mackerel, cod, eggs, avocado, cold olive oil       Dr. Fuhrman’s Anti craving salad dressing (Tweed, 2015): ¼ cup balsamic vinegar, ½ cup water, ¼ cup walnuts, ¼ cup raisins, ¼ tsp dried thyme, 1 tsp Dijon mustard, 1 clove minced garlic. Blend in a blender and add to salads.   Dr. Fuhrman’s 6 steps to reduce cravings (Tweed, 2015): Have a large salad as your main dish and include some raw vegetables ¼ - ½ cup of Beans each day – filling and satisfying, Dr. Fuhrman says they are a terrific antidote A Large bowl of steamed greens (steam for less than 13 minutes to prevent loss of nutrients) Nuts and seeds – include walnuts, chia seeds, flaxseed, sesame seed (Raw and Unsalted) Mushrooms and Onions. Mushrooms should be well cooked to remove the bacterial contamination Eat 3 fruits per day, and Dr. Fuhrman recommends eating them with your meals to dilute their sugars and slow their absorption into the blood. (Its preferable that fruit is fresh as opposed to dried).   Dr. Fuhrman, Tweed (2015) says that the longer you stay away from the starchy and sugary or salty craving foods from the past the less you will crave them.   This is great news for those wanting to reach a healthy weight, but have been sabotaged by your cravings in the past.

White bait, Flathead fillet and spinach

  Ingredients: Purchase some white bait and flathead fillets from your local fishmonger. Fresh white bait should still have firmness and not be too soft or squishy. Flathead fillets are a lovely soft white fleshed fish to use when feeding fussy kids. 1 bunch Fresh English Spinach 1 cup of either flour or almond meal (if you want to avoid gluten) 1 tablespoon olive oil Salt and pepper to taste   Method: Wash, then roughly chop the spinach and put into a steamer. Generously coat a large pan with oil (extra-light olive oil is good) so that there is a 5mm layer over the bottom, and place it on the stove When the pan has heated sufficiently to crisp and bubble a pinch of flour, place the flour/almond meal into a ziplock or other plastic bag along with some salt and pepper and put the fish into it, sealing the bag and shaking the contents until they are nicely coated. Don't leave them in the bag too long or they will go sticky. Remove fish from the bag and fry them in the pan, being careful not to put too many in at once. Turn them over when golden underneath. It should only take a few minutes to fry the fish to a golden colour, then remove and place them on some paper to drain off. As the last batch of fish is set to fry, steam the spinach and then season with some freshly crushed garlic, olive oil and pepper. Plate the fish, using the spinach as an accompaniment. Add a squeeze of lemon juice over the fish as a final enhancement and garnish with some parsley or sliced shallots.

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