Health

Self-care for stomach problems

In a previous blog article we looked at a common gastric condition called hypochlorhydria, which relates to a decreased production of stomach acid. We learned that in many, if not most conditions where heartburn, acidity, reflux and indigestion occurred, it wasn’t likely that there was too much acid production, but rather, a weakening, thinning and loss of insulation of the stomach lining due to various factors such as stress, diet and medication. The compromised lining results in a vulnerability of the stomach to even modest amounts of acid, resulting in symptoms that make you feel like you are producing too much acid. In such situations therefore, taking antacids to neutralise acid levels, or drugs to block the production of acid may alleviate some symptoms, but they ultimately fail to correct the underlying problem and will result in further health problems down the line.

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Helicobacter Pylori – Controversy and Consensus

Helicobacter pylori is a common bacterial infection among humans. Some studies show it infects the stomach lining of over 60% of the world's population, and in some areas up to 90% of the population. Up until 1982, most scientists clearly saw a relationship between stomach ulcers and stress. Then it was suggested that maybe the ulcer was the result of a bacterial infection. Since then we have found that over 80% of people suffering from duodenal ulcers are infected by H. pylori, as well as 70% of people with gastric ulcers.

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Stem Cell therapy for arthritis Pros & Cons

Stem Cell Therapy- What is it? A stem cell is a type of cell which can divide and duplicate itself, as well as differentiate into (become) different types of functional tissue. Babies develop from a single differentiating and dividing cell and they give rise to embryonic stem cells, while in adults there are different types of stem cells sourced from fat (adipose) tissue, marrow, or blood, called mesenchymal stem cells that are believed to be involved in the repair and healing of injured tissues. Cells are either harvested from the patients themselves (in the case of adult mesenchymal cells), or harvested from embryos or the placenta of newborns, then lab cultured or processed into a concentrated solution, sometimes with the addition of chemicals.

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How to breathe better

It is a common experience for many physical therapy professionals such as chiropractors, osteopaths, physiotherapists and others to notice that many of their patients suffering from back problems have poor breathing habits. The expansion and contraction of the ribcage with deep inspiration is often abnormal, uneven from left to right  and they often breathe in at a different speed to breathing out. They also tend to suffer from a range of other conditions including cardiovascular, digestive and stress related health issues. An important key in rehabilitating many of these conditions is to get them to breathe more effectively.

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The Vagus Nerve – the self-help key to beating stress

The Vagus nerve is one of the 12 pairs of cranial nerves. Unlike almost all our other nerves that emerge from the spine (hence chiropractic's fascination for spinal manipulation), cranial nerves emerge directly out of the brain to travel to their target tissues. The job of cranial nerves is usually of critical importance to survival. In the case of the Vagus Nerve, we have our primary mechanism for dealing with stress and its long term destructive effects.

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