Children

Salicylate Sensitivity

  Salicylate Sensitivity Salicylates are chemicals that occur naturally in many plants. They are produced by the plant to regulate flowering, growth, ripening and they act as a natural pesticide against fruit fly and other destructive pests, as well as limiting fungus and mould growth. Some people have a sensitivity to moderate levels of salicylates which can either be genetically predisposed, or the result of foetal exposure to pesticides and other chemical irritants. While salicylates are naturally occurring, higher than acceptable levels in some people causes them to react and display any number of physiological and psycho-behavioural symptoms such as hyperactivity and "silliness". The symptoms can vary quite widely however, with other more common symptoms reported below:

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Bedwetting in children

A common children's condition we see at the clinic is bedwetting (nocturnal enuresis). It is normal for children below the ages of 4 or 5 to lack control of their bladder, however, if this continues after the age of 5, it could signify a problem. Primary enuresis is described as bedwetting in a child beyond 5 years old who has never been able to establish good bladder control. Secondary enuresis is described as a bedwetting relapse in a child who was previously toilet trained.   There are several alternative medicine therapies that have published reports on treatments for bedwetting. These include:   Dietary modification Craniosacral therapy Acupuncture  

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Treatment during Pregnancy

Pregnancy carries a range of experiences for new mums-to-be. Besides the joy of nurturing a new life, there are also the more uncomfortable experiences of back ache, sciatica, carpal tunnel syndrome, swollen legs and nausea that needs to be endured. As her body changes, a woman will experience a shift in weight bearing position, a change in her posture and greater strain on her back and pelvis. All of these discomforts can be relieved through a range of therapies performed by our practitioners, ranging from acupuncture, craniosacral therapy, manual therapy, spinal manipulation and myofascial therapy.

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Retained Neonatal Reflexes

NEONATAL REFLEXES Infants are born with a strongly developed set of reflexes called neonatal or primitive reflexes. Experts believe that the purpose of these reflexes is survival based. Examples of these  include: The suckling reflex- where stimulating the lips or side of the mouth causes the baby to turn toward the stimulus and begin a suckling action The palmar grip reflex - where lightly stroking the palm, or placing a finger in the hand of the infant causes them to close it and grip strongly The Moro reflex - where a sudden backwards tilt causes the infant to throw their arms and legs outward Asymmetric Tonic Neck Reflex- when the baby is on its back, turning its head to the left causes the left arm to straighten and the right arm to bend (& vice versa) Galant Reflex - stroking along the spine causes a twitch in the back muscles on the same side Around six months of age, many of the reflexes begin to wane (or integrate) and are slowly replaced by postural reflexes, whose purpose is to allow independent movement of limbs from head movement; manipulation of objects by hand, to sit up, crawl and eventually balance on two legs and walk. The chart below (courtesy of Inspiral Paediatric seminars) shows a timeline of the transition from primitive reflexes to postural reflexes.  

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Childrens Developmental Milestones

  KNOWING YOUR CHILD'S MILESTONES: SIGNS of DELAYED DEVELOPMENT   The following brief list may help you to notice any delays or abnormalities in your child's progress and prompt you to have them checked by a suitably qualified health care provider:   0-3 months: not smiling by 8 weeks not calming down, at least for a little while, when picked up being unusually floppy or stiff having different muscle tone or strength in an arm and leg on one side compared with the other side having unusually 'good' head control due to stiff muscles always holding fingers in a tight fist not startled by sudden noises having feeding problems beyond 'normal' range – find out more from your Child and Family Health nurse crying for long periods, or ongoing problems settling being unusually 'good' and not demanding not watching your face when you speak to them by 3 months not making sounds other than crying by 3 months.

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